“By Their Fruits Ye Shall Know Them”

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I am just plain sick and tired of being discriminated against because I’m white and I’m not going to take it anymore!

Oh wait, I’m not discriminated against because I’m white.

Never mind.

I’m really getting very good at levitating when news breaks while I’m watching MSNBC.

And of course I turned to Twitter and #affirmativeaction to see how other people were expressing their horror and revulsion at the thought of Jeff Sessions using the Civil Rights Division to investigate the non-discrimination of white people at universities.

Heart-sickeningly, what I found were mostly accolades for Sessions and his decision, which I personally think is his way of trying to get back into Donald Trump’s good graces.

I responded to only a couple of the tweets, pointing out that Affirmative Action is a really tiny step that the US has made toward reparations and should be kept strong.

Here are the tweets, starting with the one I initially replied to:

#AffirmativeAction is a racist cancer. Paternalistic whites who think blacks can only get ahead if they’re given a head start. Toxic.

 

(Me: Not paternalism, just a tiny step toward reparations.)

Same tweeter:

So many socks.https://twitter.com/Radicalgrrrrl/status/892736574059884544 

Not sure what that means, but he posted my twitter profile.

A different tweeter:

Take your tablets and go back to bed now, Cynthia.

 

Yet another:

Does welfare count?

 

The next few are from the same person:

  • For dead people by people that didn’t have crap to do with it? Lol. Nope.
  • People who blame others for their failures are destined to stay failures.
  • It’s a discriminatory law.
  • The government shouldn’t be involved AT ALL with hiring decisions.

 

From the tweeter who told me to take my tablets and go to bed:

Yes. Go on now, dear.

 

The most recent:

Only 3% of the white people living today had ancestors who owned slaves! WHY SHOULD WE ALL PAY FOR THE EVIL OF THE FEW?! YOU ARE SICK!!!!!

 

It was interesting to note that all four of the respondents use made-up names and pictures of well-known people or cartoons in their profiles.

The Scripture “By their fruits ye shall know them” becomes more meaningful to me day by day. I am blessed to know the compassionate, loving, peace-filled, generous fruits of many, many people on Twitter and in person. Sadly, this can make them the target of people who hide behind fake images and names. At least we have the courage of our convictions.

PS: It’s time to rename the Department of Justice.

Refugees – 0; White Supremacy – 14

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It started this way:

I follow Amarnath Amarasingam on Twitter. He is a senior research fellow at the London-based Institute for Strategic Dialogue. On July 19, he posted part of an article that he and Jacob Davey wrote for The Mantle, a newsletter of mantlethought.org about Generation Identitaire.

Among other things this group does is hire ships to go to sea and interfere with humanitarian efforts to rescue refugees.

“They are vehemently nativist, anti-immigration, anti-Islam, anti-liberal and anti-left wing. Individual members of the group express support for white supremacism, and their anti-globalist rhetoric is often dog-whistle anti-Semitism,” wrote Mr. Amarasingam and Mr. Davey in their article.

I responded to Mr. Amarasingam’s tweet: “Heard about them about a month ago. Scariest thing is how young they are. What makes people so evil?”

I got many likes and retweets and one comment agreeing with me. Two people took exception. Here’s the first one:

“And let’s be clear, they are human beings that fit your narrative. If Donald Trump and his family was in a boat you’d be happy to see it sunk.”

Not sure how this person knows that I would do that. In fact, I would try to save them if I were in a position to, but I’m sure the Trumps would take over my boat and toss me off.

Someone else was much more exercised and sent several tweets between July 19 and July 24. This is the order in which they came. I am omitting quotation marks now and have not edited the tweets for spelling or grammar:

  1. A majority of the people in Italy are pleading to stop these NGO’s are 62% of the Italians Evil?
  2. Are the Dutch, Austrians and Poles assholes because they do not want to subjugate their country to Africans?
  3. Africa a continent 5 times the size of Europe, full of minerals and resources abundant agricultural opportunities? Why Europe??

(I responded that perhaps the answer is karma because Europe had raped Africa and plundered its resources.)

  1. The white Europeans are the destiny for millions Africans, while Africa is 5 times Europ, full of resources and agricultural posibilities.

(I responded that this is the original racist argument and doesn’t fly.)

  1. In 1900 a large part of Africa did not have a written history, they literally lived in the pre-history
  2. Colonization lasted 60 years, compare that with Polish plight, It was invade in 1939 and freed in 1990. Befor 1914 itwas 200 year occupied
  3. Africans had cordial contact with Europeans since 1450, but somehowe they did not learn anything from the Europeans
  4. It was in 1900 that Europeans started to abolish slavery in Africa.
  5. Europeans did not need much resources during the period of Colonization
  6. The population explosion in Africa is thanks to Europeans, Nigeria can only feed its population thanks to oil export!
  7. By blaming the Europeans for the plight of the Africans you are inciting hate and conducting hate speech.
  8. 11 mln black slaves were transported in 200 years all sold by black Africans, 11 mln white males were slaughtered in 4 years Worl War I
  9. (This is paraphrased) You don’t know your African history.
  10. Strong line of reasoning: “they are white supremacist”. brilliant!

Well, I guess they told me! In all this tweeting, however, I can’t help but think of the boatloads of Jews who were turned away from safe shores in the late 1930s.

 

Obama’s Legacy Will Endure

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Everything that the current resident of the White House has done since he took office, which has mainly been deregulating every regulation the Obama Presidency put in place, and everything that the GOP Congress has attempted, is because these white men cannot ABIDE the thought of our country having any trace of having been led by an African-American.

There are headlines just in the past couple of days about the Trump administration’s attempts to dismantle President Obama’s legacy. But I have news for the White House:

They cannot dismantle President Obama’s legacy.

All that Trump is doing is ensuring that Barack Obama will go down in history as one of the best Presidents we have ever had who was followed by the worst president we have ever had.

This past winter, it took Rachel Maddow almost a half hour to list, not explain or analyze but to list, all of the extremely positive measures that President Obama was responsible for.

Trump and his fellow racists can never take that away from him.

There’s a saying that history is written by the winners. I don’t think that is strictly true. However, history does celebrate the winners and the times when truth and goodness prevail.

President Obama is a winner who will be celebrated in history because he is a man of integrity, compassion, and plain old human decency. He is able to look at situations from all sides and to look to advisers to help in that task. He has nerve and he doesn’t freak out at any setback. He takes responsibility and does not apportion blame to the nearest fall guy. Oh yeah, and he’s very, very intelligent.

Trump is a loser, a clown, a liar, a cheat, an anti-intellectual, and most likely the perpetrator of treason and other high crimes and misdemeanors. He is also a hater, and what he hates most (and you can bet Steve Bannon is goading him on) is that he follows a man of color who is happily married to a real woman of an even darker color and the father of intelligent, charming daughters who also have, of course, a darker skin tone than your average white supremacist.

There’s this: Trump

And this: Image result for Obama pictures

I believe that history will record Barack Obama as the President who lifted us up and lifted up the moral tone of this country during very difficult times.

And it will record Donald Trump as the reprobate who tried to bring the country down. All because of the color of Obama’s skin.

 

Innocent/Guilty “Until”

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Having just heard the verdict about the policeman who murdered Philando Castile, seeing Nick Cave’s exhibit “Until” at Mass MOCA was not only timely but even more devastating.

Cave’s installation was mounted in September 2016 and remains until September 2017. “Until” refers to “innocent until proven guilty.” Or does it? Guilty until proven innocent is what is really implied, because Cave’s art is built on, and haunted by, the ghosts of Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Eric Garner, Oscar Grant, Yvette Smith and more.

The program says that the installation began with Cave asking himself, “Is there racism in heaven?” His answer is an experience rather than just a matter of looking at one art piece. One is confronted by masses of glittery mobiles twisting and turning. They are mostly beautiful and mesmerizing; then one sees that many of the mobiles depict guns, bullets, and targets.

One walks through this maze of glitter to a crystal cloud atop which is a huge garden of ceramic birds, gramophone horns, and, startlingly, black-face lawn jockeys. One has to climb a very tall ladder to see this site of mainly found objects.

After passing through and around a wall of plastic beads that look like netting, from far away, you enter a dark room with a giant lifeguard chair in the center and a frenetic video that plays on the walls. While my sister and I were there, we were the only museum-goers who stayed to watch the whole video, which is unsettling and somewhat sinister at times. It ends with a chorus of black-face tap dancers; all the while, a video of swirling shallow water is cast on the floor, so you feel off-balance anyway.

IMG_20170621_123518488The last part of the installation is a metaphorical wall of water meant to seem cleansing. It is only the last part, though, physically. I promise that if you go, or have a chance to see it elsewhere, you will carry the installation in your mind and heart for a while.

To see a slo-mo video of the mobiles, go to Nick Cave installation.

 

Pauli Murray: Activist, Lawyer, Priest, Prophet

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Like many people who commented on the Pauli Murray Project page, I wonder how I got to this age without knowing about her.

And I only know about her because I came upon Patricia Bell-Scott’s book The Firebrand and the First Lady, at Val-Kill, Eleanor Roosevelt’s home.

Pauli Murray had a hard row to hoe, but the scrappy, chronically underweight woman beat the odds and achieved her dreams of becoming a lawyer and then one of the very first women priests in the Episcopal Church of America, all the while fighting tenaciously for civil rights.

She was organizing sit-ins at Washington, DC, lunch counters years before SNCC existed. She wrote letters to just about everyone of authority in the white-dominated world about indignities visited upon African-Americans beginning in the 1930s.

Her first sight of Eleanor Roosevelt, called “ER” throughout the book, was at a Depression-era work camp for homeless women where Murray was resident. At the time, she refused to acknowledge ER, but wrote to her a few years later and thus a deep friendship began.

Murray fought her way into the “club” that included Thurgood Marshall, Howard Thurman, and Bayard Rustin. Thurman in particular she considered a mentor. She and Marshall often disagreed on ways and means of fighting for civil rights, but they respected and admired each other.

So why is Pauli Murray so little known? Well, she was black, she was a woman, and she was a lesbian. Hmmm, three strikes against her and still she persevered, all the while dealing with ill health and being the mainstay of her extended family.

So I invite you, if you do not know her, to get to know Pauli Murray better now. She herself published several books. The wonderful thing about Bell-Scott’s book is that diehard Eleanor Roosevelt admirers like me get to see another side of her all the while learning something new.

You can see Pauli Murray’s bibliography, extended biography and more at www.paulimurrayproject.org.

 

 

Everything New is Old Again

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I was not aware of Claude McKay, a founder of the Harlem Renaissance, until The New York Times announced recently that an unpublished manuscript of his had been found in 2009 and was about to be published.

I thought that Amiable with Big Lips sounded like a satirical romp and immediately read it. While satire is among McKay’s writing tools, it was anything but a romp. It was a deadly serious look at 1930s Harlem, which McKay described basically as a colony in a nation even back then (I was listening to Chris Hayes’ book at the same time).

The plot involves an Africamerican (McKay’s term) organization created to raise money for Ethiopia after Mussolini’s invasion. A Communist-led group of white people also create an organization, ostensibly to help Ethiopia, but also with the aim of luring Africamericans into the Popular Front because it is believed that they will be easy to manipulate.

There were so many points in the book at which I was amazed by how the story mirrored our world today, especially in light of the Trump regime, that I lost track of counting them.

I am now flinging myself into McKay’s oeuvre; Banana Bottom is the second novel I have read. It takes place in his homeland, Jamaica, at the turn of the century. A young peasant girl, Bita Plant, is taken in by English missionaries. It is Mrs. Craig’s experiment to show that she can take the “wild” out of the peasant by raising her as a young Englishwoman.

When Bita returns to Jamaica after seven years being “finished” in England, she exerts her own mind and upsets all of Mrs. Craig’s plans. Mrs. Craig thinks she’s reverting to type, when in fact, Bita decides that she is her own person and will choose how she will live.

There is a lot more beside, including the racism with which slavery and colonialism infect non-white populations. McKay’s description of every character includes skin tone. Peasants are dark; the emerging middle class is light-skinned. Enough said.

An in-depth look at the politics of Amiable with Big Teeth and more scholarly discussion can be found in The Atlantic magazine’s article by Jennifer Wilson: Forgotten Harlem The article also includes a bibliography of McKay’s work.