The 21st Century Pieta

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On Good Friday, Christians around the world assume an attitude of mourning as they commemorate the steps to the cross that Jesus took.

When I say “assume,” I don’t mean they’re pretending. For millions of people, this day reminds them of the suffering of an innocent man who took on the world’s darkness and allowed himself to be sacrificed. The Roman-ruled world could not understand his message of a new compact between God and human beings.

As I follow the cross through my own little village in the rain later today, I shall be mourning other sacrifices as well: the sacrifices of the souls of Margery Stoneman Douglas High School, of Stephon Clark, of Danny Ray Thomas, of Anthony Stephan House, of Draylen Mason.

Sacrificial lambs of a country that refuses to deal with racism, the NRA, white supremacy, police who refuse to consider less than lethal force when dealing with black men.

Sacrificial lambs of a society that espouses “right to life” but doesn’t blink when children’s lives and black lives are taken.

stephon clarkStephon Clark was standing in his grandmother’s backyard holding a cell phone when he was shot 20 times. At a Sacramento Council meeting, a protestor said that a grandmother’s backyard was “a sacred space.”

 

Danny Ray Thomas was for unknown reasons walking with his pants down and his hands in view when he was murdered by police. Two years ago, while he was in jail on a drug charge, his girlfriend drowned their two young children. His was already a life of unendurable pain.

anthony houseAnthony Stephan House was getting ready to go to work when he picked up a package on his porch that exploded and killed him. His young daughter was in the house.

 

draylen masonDraylen Mason was a high school senior and classical musician who had not yet heard that he was to receive a scholarship to Oberlin Conservatory of Music in Ohio to continue his studies when he too picked up a package on his porch.

The 17 children and staff of MSD were just going about their daily routine at school.

I was only 8 years old when I saw Leonardo Da Vinci’s “Pieta” at the World’s Fair. It made me cry.

From now on when I think “Pieta,” I will see the mothers of all the children killed in massacres and the black men, women, and children killed by police who act as judge, jury, and executioner.

How long will we let our society continue to condemn them to death?

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The GOP’s War on Christmas

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Yes, Virginia, there is a War on Christmas.

It’s just not being waged by those who the “president” and Bill O’Reilly have accused.

You see, Virginia, the “president” and the Congressional GOP mostly identify as Christians. Yet, less than a week before the celebration of the birth of Jesus, they have shown themselves to either blatantly disregard, or not believe in, any of Jesus’s teachings.

Rather than feed the hungry, clothe the poor, visit those in prison, or heal the sick, the “president” and the GOP want to enrich the already wealthy, steal from the poor, arrest the protesters. and let the sick get sicker even to the point of death.

Take care of widows and orphans? Oh no, they say with their actions, we need that money to pay for the billions of dollars we are giving our donors and ourselves.

Not only that, your children and your children’s children will have to deal with the mess of the trillion-dollar deficit and the ruined environment.

We don’t really know whether Jesus was born in a barn, but we have faith that this story reflects God’s message to human kind.

Wealth, earthly power, and political authority are not what God wants for God’s people. Sharing one’s heart and soul with all God’s children – and therefore our sisters and brothers – and caring for the most vulnerable in any society is what brings the kingdom of heaven to earth.

If we fight the GOP’s War on Christmas, we have righteousness on our side, Virginia. Never forget that loving the outcast, welcoming the stranger, and walking side by side with those who have met with discrimination are our weapons.

This is a war we can win if we believe in the sanctity of our cause. Christians, Jews, Muslims, and humanists can all agree and come together to form a great army that is on the side of justice.

Let it be so.

 

 

 

By Their Fruits You’ll Know Them

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When I was in my 20s, I went out with a man who made himself objectionable to my friends.

One friend, an older man, tried to talk to me about the relationship. He pointed out that if a person is kind to everyone, that is a good character trait. But, he said, if someone like my boyfriend was only nice to me but unkind to others, it could mean he was just trying to get something from me.

I was hurt, and the relationship went on to a predictably unhappy ending. It took many years for me to gain the wisdom to see that my friend had given me some serious life advice.

I thought of this unhappy episode Saturday morning while listening to Scott Simon on NPR’s Weekend Edition. He interviewed David French of The National Review. This was before the Northern California shooting, and not a week after the Sutherland, Texas, rampage.

Mr. French was there to accuse “Twitter activists” of being unfair to politicians who offer “thoughts and prayers” after mass shootings.

“. . .the prayer life of a Christian is something that’s very, very rich,” he said. “And prayer saturates their lives. . .So when you’re targeting prayers, a Christian, for example, would look at that and be, frankly, kind of puzzled by it.”

As a Christian, as someone who believes in the power of prayer, and as a “Twitter activist,” I bristled at Mr. French’s words. Perhaps you had to hear his patronizing tone. He spoke as if only Christians have a rich prayer life and as if “Twitter activists” are heathens.

Mr. French went on to say that “it’s not that these politicians are offering thoughts and prayers and no action . . . “ Yet he equivocated about what kind of action these politicians are supposedly taking. In fact, Mr. French said that he can’t even imagine what kind of action might have been appropriate after the Las Vegas massacre.

When Mr. Simon suggested that it is the difference in reactions to domestic terrorism and imported terrorism, Mr. French said, “But different mass killings demand different kinds of responses. They’re not all the same.”

He concludes by saying, “What use is an activist tweet anyway?”

Well, I’ll you, Mr. French. The more people who are talking about the problem of gun violence in this country by home-grown terrorists, the better. The politicians you say we twitter activists are criticizing unfairly are white male members of the GOP such as Mitch McConnell and Paul Ryan, who only like government when it is used to hurt people, such as punishing tax “reform” (read tax cuts for the wealthiest of the wealthy) and taking away any kind of a safety net for the most vulnerable among us.

I do not believe them when they speak of thoughts and prayers. Mr. French, you quoted Scripture on the air; I’ll quote back at you: “You will know them by their fruits.” (Matthew 7:16) This is Jesus speaking, the rest of the Sermon on the Mount, where he has spoken about the poor, the humble, and hypocrites. It doesn’t get any more “Christian” than that. And the fruits of the politicians who talk about “thoughts and prayers” when they have the power to take action (“Faith without works is dead” James; not a scriptural principle, Mr. French, but actual Scripture) to prevent these tragic, senseless, avoidable murders is nil. If a bill is brought to the Senate or the Congress that might actually help citizens of the United States, and I include Puerto Ricans here, these politicians will do their damnedest to derail it.

I learned my friend’s lesson well, because what he was really telling me was “You will know them by their fruits.” That’s what I look for in a politician. They can say whatever they like, but what do they do?

If they do good in the rest of their dealings, fine, I believe them when they send thoughts and prayers. If they don’t, like our current GOP-controlled Congress, I don’t believe them. And I’m not puzzled by twitter activists who criticize them.

Adventures in Twitterland

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Here’s a tip: If you use Twitter, don’t mention “white men” and “guns” in the same sentence unless you want to hear from every angry white man with a gun in the country.

I did and got more than 600 angry notifications and still counting.

Oh, their white female counterparts chimed in also; it’s hard to tell sometimes because not one of them uses his or her own name and the majority use an avatar for their profile picture.

I was called everything from an ignoramus to a cow to an old hag to cunt. It was suggested that since I obviously was alive during World War II, I should know how important white men with guns are. And I should be reported to the FBI. These are some of the less offensive remarks!

In just seven words in which I suggested that white men with guns are dangerous in our society, it somehow also turns out that I am racist, sexist, a “libtard,” a race-baiter, and a traitor to my country.

Here’s the irony: The respondents jumped all over themselves to charge that Muslims, African-Americans, and Mexicans are the truly dangerous people; one gentleman suggested that I am a racist while using the “N” word.

And Chicago. I can’t even count how many people mentioned Chicago. These people’s Supreme Leader started talking about what a morass Chicago was during his campaign and even this week brought up Chicago after Ali Vitali of NBC asked him about extreme vetting for gun buyers. You might recall this was when he said that with gun control, the slaughter in Sutherland, Texas, would have been much worse.

Then the “conversation” (of which I was no longer a part) turned to the stated “fact” that the white male killers are all Democrats, liberals, and atheists.

I forebore to bring up the white men with guns who originally plundered this continent and decimated the indigenous peoples.

I forebore to bring up the white men with guns who herded human beings they’d kidnapped onto ships , tossed some overboard if they needed to lighten the ship, and sold the rest into slavery.

I forebore to bring up the mass murder of freed African-Americans by white men with guns during Reconstruction, or the lynchings that have continued to this day.

I also forebore to call any of these people by derogatory, vile names or make suggestions about violent sexual acts they could perform on themselves.

I’m not seeking sympathy or comfort. I’m a big girl now and we have to know what is going through the minds of the opposition in order to respond to it. But how does one respond to people who appear to be brainwashed from birth? And who are so insecure that they threaten 65-year-old women who don’t agree with them?

I know that not all shooters are white men. However, when the shooter IS a white man, we can be damn sure that nothing will be done to prevent it happening again. The GOP simply refuses to put the word “domestic” in front of “terrorism.”

 

 

He Accentuates The Positive

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Harry Bell, left, with CT NAACP head Scot Esdaile

“Instead of dope in a vein, hope in a brain,” said the Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. when he made a guest appearance on “A Different World” many, many years ago.

Harry Bell was 9 years old at the time and he never forgot it.

He had a good reason to be sensitive to messages about drug use. His young birth mother was an addict and she left him at the hospital where he was born in Bridgeport, CT. His aunt, Marvetta Bell, raised him. He grew in low-income housing where he witnessed peers be defeated by the negative situation of their young lives.

Mr. Bell chose a different path. “I always knew that with every negative situation, there is a positive way out,” he says in his bio. That positive way out for him was to create a series of coloring books called “Color a Positive Thought,” and he hopes to them into the hands of as many children as possible.

coloring book“I wanted to create something fun, educational and empowering at the same time,” he recalled. “I dwelled on it for weeks, considering many different ideas. During this time, I was hit with a huge blow that will affect my entire life. My son was diagnosed with Type One diabetes.”

But, “the day I thought my life had ended was the day my life began,” he says now. Seeing his son having to grapple with a negative situation, he tried to find a coloring book that would make him feel better. He couldn’t anything so he dug up an old shoebox full on inspirational quotes and sketches that he had collected in his youth. A friend who was a graphic designer took the sketches and ideas and turned Mr. Bell’s vision into a coloring book with his son’s face on the cover.

That was that, he thought, but his son loved it so much he took it to school with and showed his friends and teachers. One teacher passed it around to her coworkers and it ended with an invitation to talk to her class about each page. Soon, a news station called asking for an interview. It snowballed from there.

“Before long I was getting calls from local media, schools, churches, parents, daycare center, and libraries to speak or to do interviews about the book. Everybody wanted copies. Suddenly, I realized this was my calling.”

In addition to the coloring book, Mr. Bell has created two programs through his work as a school resource officer. One is a mentoring program that was inspired by his own mentor, Howard T. Owens. “The mentors are from low=income areas but they made it through,” he said. They’ve all experienced the negative influences that youth are going through, so their relationships with their mentees have authenticity to them.

Munchkin Fridays is another program that Mr. Bell started three years ago. It’s appropriately named, as those who participate are youngsters, and who doesn’t love a Dunkin’ Donuts Munchkin or two on a Friday?

He gives out doughnuts to about 60 children and with each one offers a positive message. Dunkin’ Donuts is now donating the tasty treats.

In a world that has many people feeling negative about a whole lot of things, Mr. Bell’s optimism and energy is refreshing and inspirational. I’m tempted to ask him to make a coloring book with positive messages for adults!

Mr. Bell is available for book signings and speaking engagements. His website, where the coloring books can be purchased, is http://www.colorapositivethought.com/

Cruz Bruises Trump Ego

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I don’t think it’s unfair to say that the GOP, and especially the current White House regime, hates women.

These privileged men especially hate women who stand up for themselves.

These white privileged men especially and truly hate women of color who stand up for themselves.

Enter Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz of San Juan, who not only stood up for herself but also for the entire American citizenry of Puerto Rico.

She went high when they went low, so low as to ignore for many days the disastrous aftermath of a hurricane on American soil.

I hope that FEMA director Brock Long has nightmares about her. He ought to; his agency has miserably failed Puerto Rico despite his official bio on the FEMA website that credits him with years of “robust” (I think that word needs to be retired; way overused in the past three years).

And oh, right, the FEMA website that took down anything to do with how FEMA continues to fail Puerto Rico.

They have retained a timeline of the supposed federal response to Puerto Rico beginning on September 17 that cannot possibly be true, according to reports from Mayor Cruz and other eyewitnesses including anyone who’s been watching video coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

Somebody’s lying. I know who I think is telling the truth.

Mayor Cruz, 54, is one of those people who did not seek out greatness but has had greatness thrust upon her.

She earned a Bachelor of Arts Magna Cum Laude from Boston University in political science and a Master of Science from Carnegie Mellon University in public management. After working in the private sector in human resources on the mainland, she returned to Puerto Rico in 1992 and immediately began her career in public service, working as an advisor to various mayors.

Mayor Cruz was elected to the Puerto Rican House of Representatives on her second try, serving from 2009 to 2013, when she made the successful run for mayor of San Juan. She has been deeply involved in women’s issues as well as urban renewal of poor sections of the city. She has also forged an alliance with the city of Chicago with Illinois Representative (?) Luis Gutierrez, who has been outspoken about the shabby treatment of the devastated island by the Trump administration.

Mayor Cruz has become the face of all of Puerto Rico, not just San Juan, as she refused to stop crying out about the desperate situation there. She has refused to kowtow to the Disaster-in-Chief as the governor of Puerto Rico did, and she has called out Brock Long when he patronizingly told her to get with the program, when there was really not program to get with.

In so doing, she has joined Michelle Obama, Hillary Clinton, and Elizabeth Warren in the Nasty Women Club. She’s in great company. But such is the insane whirlwind of news that bombards us daily, it could be that many people forget her in the days to come. I hope that doesn’t happen. She’s got brains, she’s got compassion, and she’s got intelligence. The US needs her.

Who We Are, Who We Want to Be

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In the aftermath of the Charlottesville tragedy, amid the outrage and grief and disbelief, I had to re-learn a painful lesson for a white American.

Most of the people I follow on Twitter are African-American journalists, politicians and activitists: Charles Blow, Bree Newsome, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Vann R. Newkirk II, Jamelle Bouie.

Ms. Newsome, the woman who climbed the flagpole in front of the South Carolina statehouse and took down the flag, put what the others were saying in one form or another most succinctly.

As white Americans cried, “This is not who we are!”, in fact, this is exactly who you are and have been and all black people know it, she said.

I know it too; I’ve been writing about it for some time now, but it hasn’t stayed at the forefront of my attention. White America is a racist society and has been since the first white European stepped foot on this continent and had the arrogance to claim it as a white man’s (and I do mean man’s, not human’s) paradise.

To make that paradise, however, meant neutralizing one way or another the indigenous peoples. Usually by slaughter, often by treaties that were never meant to be kept and to this day are not honored.

Then came the importation of Africans to actually do the work of building an economy. Next came the battles to seize land from the indigenous Mexicans, Polynesians and Inuits and Aleuts.

In every era, white “Americans” have taken something away from someone else, right up to the present time. Now, it’s not only enough to take something away, but white American society wants to bar others from coming in, based solely on religion. And even the liberal arguments in favor of immigrants more often than not points out their economic worth rather than their worth as human beings.

What happened in Charlottesville is not new to its black citizenry; Mr. Newkirk’s most recent article in The Atlantic spells it out briefly and powerfully.

We cannot say, “This is not who we are!” We can, and must, say, “This is not who we want to be,” but only if we’re willing to follow up words with action. Mr. Newkirk quotes Charlottesville-Albemarle NAACP President Emeritus M. Rick Turner: “People want to have a conversation . . . But see we’ve had conservations, ever since the Civil War, every time something happens. That’s why nothing ever gets done beyond that, because the courage stops right there.”

I could say that the counter-protestors in Boston and other cities this weekend prove this thesis wrong. But we have not heard the last from the white supremacists. Do we, who consider ourselves non-racist, have the courage to go beyond the conversations?

Heather Heyer did.